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The article in the issue 1:

The date of the publication:
2012-05-08
The number of pages:
103
The issue:
1
Commentaries:
2
The Authors
Igor Dzhadan, Alex Shkotin, Vladimir Ryakhovsky, Nicholas N. Zhaldak, Petr Kusliy, Vsevolod Ladov, Alexander Boldachev, Andrej Ule, Andrew Schumann, András Máté, Péter Szegedi, Andrei Krennikov, Andy Adamatzky,

Andrew Adamatzky is Professor in Unconventional Computing in the Department of Computer Science, amir of the Unconventional Computing Centre, and a member of Bristol Robotics Lab. He does research in reaction-diffusion computing, cellular automata, physarum computing, massive parallel computation, applied mathematics, collective intelligence and robotics. He is one of the founders of unconventional computing thinking in natural sciences.

Email: andrew.adamatzky@uwe.ac.uk

Andrew Schumann worked at the Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus. His research focuses on logic and philosophy of science with an emphasis on non-well-founded phenomena: self-references and circularity. He contributed mainly to research areas such as reasoning under uncertainty, probability reasoning, non-Archimedean mathematics, as well as their applications to cognitive science. He is engaged also in unconventional computing, decision theory, logical modelling of economics.

Email: andrew.schumann@gmail.com
 

ARTICLE:

Interview: Is Everything a Computation?

The interview of Andrew Schumann, the managing editor of Studia Humana, with Andy Adamatzky, Professor in Unconventional Computing in the Department of Computer Science, University of the West of England, Bristol, amir of the Unconventional Computing Centre, and a member of Bristol Robotics Lab.

Andrew Schumann: What is unconventional computing? How does it differ from other approaches to computation?

Andy Adamatzky: Usually, in answering this question I could not resist quoting Tomasso Toffoli: “... a computing scheme that today is viewed as unconventional may well be so because its time hasn’t come yet — or is already gone.” This means that everything flows and nothing stays the same, e.g. at the time of analogue computers digital ones were considered unconventional, but nowadays they top the charts of modern unconventional computing devices.

 

James Tunnell
May 23rd, 2012
What a very interesting point Andy makes about computation in general. I never considered before that it has more to do with using imagination to find meaningful interpretations from the results of natural phenomena around us. Thanks for the piece!
Andrew Schumann
May 29th, 2012
I was a bit surprised also. Unconventional computing as the land of fantazy and imagination. This idea is very gnostic and Kabbalistic. Magic meanings of unconventional computing... Amazing!

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